Whats the point of .6 .8 nozzles

When I try slicing with this profiles there is little o no benefit in speed or time. Why would I want to use this nozzles ? Or is it that good tuned profiles are not out yet?

It depends on the filament you select, especially the maximum allowed volumetric flow. It may also depend on the complexity of the object like many retracts and such.

For example, I have a pretty simple object which takes 32min to print with 0.4mm nozzle and 0.2mm layer height default settings using PETG which I set to 22mm³/s maximum volumetric speed.
When changing to a 0.6mm nozzle and default 0.3mm layer height, the print time decreases to less than 23 minutes.
Which is quite something, right? :wink:

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And the 0.4 nozzle can get clogged when using filament with glass or carbon fiber inside
The 0.6 and 0.8 are a lot better suited for printing those materials

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Try slicing a big boxy object.

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You hit the nail in the head. I was slicing with generic PETG and it has a 10mm/s volumetric limit. Maybe with other filament.

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Your effective print speed should still go up, though, with a larger diameter nozzle. Less back pressure. And you can print 2 walls instead of 3 but still get the same overall wall thickness.

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I think the X1C and P1P are not easy to compare with other printers because of their potential high print speed.
While other printers save time by printing fewer perimeters or layers, the Bambu Lab printers can simply go faster to achieve the same flow with a smaller nozzle.
For example, using a 0,6mm nozzle on my Prusa MK3 made a way bigger improvement in print time compared to my X1C.
So I think you will see the biggest improvement when using high flow filaments.
I would also expect to see faster prints with small objects, because with a bigger nozzle and the greater layer height, you can print faster when the minimum layer time kicks in, right?

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I am currently using just the 0.4mm X1C print nozzle, because the print quality is so damn good on the X1C that I don’t want to risk messing with it. As a new user, I couldn’t be happier. Has anyone here tried using the 0.6mm or 0.8mm nozzles on either the X1 or P1P, and, if so, how are you liking them?

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The profile for 0.6 is too restrictive. Here’s a comparison of a large print I did with a 0.6 nozzle and 100% filled with walls, in half the time that was estimated for a 0.4 nozzle with 3 walls and 15% infill. When you go to the 0.6 nozzle, change your filament setting to a higher flow rate to correspond to the less restrictive nozzle. For example I changed my 0.6 profile from 10 to 15 mm3/s for the silk PLA I was using.

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@Hobo4ssassin How did you arrive at the 15 mm^3/s figure?

from prior testing on other printers, with comparatively inferior extruders and hotends, I knew I could run that filament at 15-20 mm3/s with a 0.6 nozzle. I decided to just try 15 and the print came out perfectly. Do your own testing though:

https://teachingtechyt.github.io/calibration.html#speed

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I also just saw this post, same concept

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As near as I can tell, the one factor that most affects the MVS is the particular hotend being used:

maxflowrate

I don’t know the name for the X1C hotend. Is it something custom? Or is it on this list?

The X1C uses a custom hotend, it is not included in this list.

I’m not finding it on their website now but I think Bambu was stating 33 mm3/s with their hotend using ABS.

Just for comparison, with a V6 hotend I was able to get like 10-13 mm3/s with a standard 0.4 nozzle and 15-20 with a 0.6 nozzle. I got around 28 mm3/s with an AliExpress 0.6 CHT nozzle on a V6

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Great info. Very cool.

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PC shows max speed 120mm/s, will a 0.8mm nozzle double speed compared to 0.4?

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Got maximum of 35mm³/s with an oiginal CHT nozzle 0.4mmn , the heater is the bottlneck, it cant sustain more than 215/220° with this flow, but someone on another thread have tried with two heater and seems it worked (he just wired them in parralele).

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Flow and Layer Height.

Tall bulky objects benefit greatly from large layer heights. 0.4 nozzles start to fall apart above 0.28mm layer height. bigger nozzle, bigger layer height ratios keep working. 0.8 can pull off 0.6 layer height easily.

ALSO some filaments are speed limited so you can get a ton more flow given the same speeds if layer lines don’t bother you.

Its really only a concern if you want to push out lots of chunky parts.

also fiber filaments often plug up 0.4 nozzles.

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I’m still not understanding the difference between going 0.8 to 0.6. Bambu recommended 0.6 to me. I was getting ready to order 0.8

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